FLUX

The large seven inch diameter pulls that define flux's aesthetic are milled from blocks of solid brass to achieve an unusual level of seamless precision and finish. The pulls are tapered inwards to make the Flux handles delightful to interact with. Seen here with a set of drawers on the left and adjustable shelving behind the right side double doors, Flux can be fitted with any combination to fit your needs.


 

Halsey Fracture

The first variant of our Halsey design that stretches its brass handles to span the cabinets full height. The handles are digitally milled from large blocks of billet brass to allow a level of seamless detailing that can't be matched by other methods. The fractured design was originally born from a mistake while computer modeling an early iteration which accidentally combined two different prototype Halsey designs. Eventually the lines were coddled to the fractured graphic you see here and also became the the first in the Halsey series to break free of symmetry.


 

halsey prime

Halsey rethinks what handles do for a cabinet. Often, what makes or breaks a cabinet is how the handles relate to the piece as a whole and how a person interacts with them. We think this interaction is the catalyst for great cabinet design. Handles aren’t really handles in Halsey - they become the driving force of the overall design. A handle’s utilitarian function disappears and your intuition tells you how to use it.


 

Halsey Five

The Halsey Five Credenza is an especially pretty combination of elements from our Halsey line of cabinets.  The lean V shaped handles play on the meandering cathedrals of its wood grain and lend a concise definition to the cabinet’s aesthetic. 


 

cobb

An elegant combination of round and sharp edges. With Cobb, a group of elements are afforded round edges and corners but with enough restraint that they remain in the realm of details and don't overpower the cabinets aesthetic. The inside corners are achieved by crafting separate frames that include what will become Cobbs legs, fusing them to the cabinets edges, and trimming excess material. A laborious process that embeds Cobb with a softer feel and fresh approach to cabinet design.